Lies, Fakery, and Fiction

By Donna Miscolta

I took vacation time from work last week to work on my new novel. I wanted to put myself on track to finish a draft by the end of the year. While I made good progress, I might have made more had I not allowed myself to be distracted by the Internet. I was posting more than usual on Facebook and Twitter, in large part about the GOP convention speeches which flabbergasted, outraged, and insulted. Ann Romney’s exclamation, “I love you, women!” sounded desperate to me. There was her fake sense of solidarity with women in America: We’re the mothers. We’re the wives. We’re the grandmothers. We’re the big sisters. We’re the little sisters and we are the daughters. You know it’s true, don’t you? Okay, an irrefutable enumeration of our familial roles, but what most of us know is true is that Ann Romney understands little about how the non-wealthy mothers, wives, grandmothers, etc., live.   Read more

Imagination

By Florencia Milito

Some time ago I read an exquisite little essay by the Italian postwar writer Natalia Ginzburg in which, in her razor-sharp, self-deprecating manner, she refers to her own imagination as “paltry.” Her piece struck a chord: I had never heard a writer speak so candidly about her own limitations. And I could identify only too well, and too painfully. My own relationship to imagination is a complicated one. I, too, have often wished for a copious, fecund imagination, one as wide as an ocean, as lush as the densest tropical jungle. And yet when I think of my own imagination, the images that come to mind are something altogether different. A tundra perhaps. Some expansive, but icy, landscape. A swath of blue-gray. The color of a wolverine’s eyes. Or, perhaps, the recurrent image that my mind conjures whenever it’s trying to break out of a period of writing blocks: a thin red line, almost like a clothesline, but infinitely thin and red like bright blood. The line is at once present (indicated by the boldness of the color) and elusive (suggested by the thinness of the line). In my fantasy, my mind needs to follow that line in order to break out of periods of aphasia, periods where I am convinced I will never be able to write a poem again. Another image comes to mind when thinking about Imagination. (I find myself unconsciously capitalizing the word, as if writing about a goddess.) The image is that of a porcelain doll, a doll that is a bit disheveled, that has a pirate’s wooden leg. My imagination then is something broken, like bird’s wings, something fragile, a miniature glass city, perfect and elusive. It is a place inside me that has been buried deeply the way a little girl fleeing war might bury a silver bell, hiding it from soldiers who will ransack everything.   Read more

Courage, Lipstick, and How I Found V-Day

By Reilly Richards

When one begins an adventure, they usually have either a great deal of knowledge on what they’re getting into or none at all. I’m still unsure which of the two applied to me when I decided I wanted to do something like Susan B. Anthony, Florence Nightingale, or Harriet Tubman at the age of 7. But I knew that by golly I was going do something whether you like it or not! As I got older I found other interests: sports, science, history, clothes. But all along the way I was continually drawn back to feminism, women challenging the system, and female roles in our culture.   Read more

The Lives Lived Beneath the Surface

By Angie Chau

As many of you know, Quiet As They Come took me back for a homecoming in Vietnam at the start of 2012. I was invited to give talks at the U.S. Embassy in Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi. I don’t use the word homecoming lightly. We left the fallen city of Saigon (now called Ho Chi Minh) in 1978 when I was 3. My parents and I escaped by boat in the middle of the night. We had tried twice before, once in 1975 and again in 1976 when we failed. There was a Malaysian refugee camp in between when we were countryless. But that is a whole other narrative. This story is about connection. This is about the gift of writing, about how we create reshaping us, about the brilliant unknowns in life akin to the writer’s journey that can be so unexpectedly delicious.   Read more

Validation at VORTEXT

By Rachel Gallaher

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hedgebrook changed my life. I know that may sound hyperbolic, but it’s true. Two months ago I had never heard of Hedgebrook. Started in 1985, the organization supports women writers by providing them with residencies on Whidbey Island, allowing them the time and space to work on their novels, their poetry, and their craft in distraction-free cabins on acres of gorgeous wooded land. A writer’s dream transformed into exquisite reality.

In May, due to the perfect mix of luck, opportunity and a generous offer, I received a full scholarship to attend Hedgebrook’s first annual VORTEXT conference—a weekend on Whidbey with a few dozen women writers, organic catered meals and heavy-hitting authors giving lectures and leading workshops. Jane Hamilton, Elizabeth George, Dorothy Allison. I was excited but nervous. Who else was attending? Would the other women look down at me as being too young, too naive? Was I a real writer? I had been writing since I was seven years old. I loved writing deeply. Passionately. But was that enough? Was I enough?   Read more

The Many Pulsating Hearts

By Wendy Ortiz

In July 2007, I stepped off a ferry onto Whidbey Island on what felt like the hottest day of the year. I arrived at Hedgebrook and was told that Gloria Steinem was on the land, in the house, for the period of time I too would be on the land and in the farmhouse.  I was stunned. Already, this experience was becoming bigger, more surreal and amazing than I could have imagined.

I was a newly married woman wearing a handmade ring. I was wondering, constantly, what this ring meant about me, how people might see me, but mostly, what it meant for the queerness I knew was in my blood.

I recently published an essay in The New York Times describing the experience of coming out to my husband and going on to fashion a life incredibly different from the one I’d planned when we’d gotten hitched in the California desert. In less than 1600 words I managed to describe one heart of the experience, which is to say that this was, and continues to be, an experience with many pulsating hearts.    Read more

Hearing Voices: Women Versing Life presents Hedgebrook

By Patricia Caspers

As a woman, how much time do you spend thinking about food: the budget, weekly menu, grocery list, shopping, preparing, and cleaning up? Daily, I prepare meals for four people, two of whom slide half their dinner to their dad when they think I’m not watching, and while I’m no longer shocked by the amount energy cooking takes, there are times when I have to muscle myself away from the poem in progress to fire up the electric burners.

In October of 2006, though, I spent two blessed weeks at Hedgebrook, a writer’s residence for women on Whidbey Island, where my only responsibility was to show up for dinner every evening: Garden fresh dinner, shared with incredible women.

Now I am shocked at how many women writers have never heard of Hedgebrook—because it’s free. Free, I tell you. Free. This gift of uninterrupted time for a woman writer is a political act on par with the first publication of Our Bodies Ourselves or The Second Shift. As evidence, I offer testimony from three former Hedgebrook Sisters:   Read more

Full House – The Country in the City 1-Day Writer’s Retreat

By Sally Charette

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remember the first time you went to the Haunted Mansion at Disneyland? It looked like a big house from the outside, but inside it was mind-bogglingly larger with seemingly infinite images and passages. That’s kind of how I felt looking back at the historic building that housed Hedgebrook’s The Country in the City 1-Day Writer’s Retreat after spending the day inside and on the grounds.

The women who made this retreat happen infused it with the spirit of Hedgebrook, which has at its core a sense of infinite time and possibility. What I took away from my three-week stay in Oak Cottage in 2000 was an understanding that it is good and necessary for the creative spirit to allow itself some time. I followed my nose around the grounds of Hedgebrook like a little kid. It was the first time I’d had so much time off work since high school.

From the moment the organizers and workshop leaders introduced themselves and told us how the day would go, I released any lingering trepidation about having a day in which to do whatever I wanted, and time began to expand beneath my fingertips.   Read more

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